Clear Search
Found 6 matches
  • filters Arrow
    • Include Idioms
      Exclude Idioms
      Only Idioms
    • Include Phrases
      Exclude Phrases
      Only Phrases
    • Include Proverbs
      Exclude Proverbs
      Only Proverbs
    • Include Loan Words
      Exclude Loan Words
      Only Loan Words
      Include Historical Loan Words
    • Close
Found 6 matches

māua māua Play

1. we both, both of us - an idiom to state that two or more people share the same attribute, interests, opinion or background.

Tau: Kei te mōhio koe ki a Rōpata? Ira: Āe, ko māua māua i Akopai i ngā tau o ngā waru tekau (HJ 2012:47). / Tau: Do you know Robert? Ira: Yes, we were both at Akopai in the eighties.

See also ko [tāua tāua]


māua Play

1. (pronoun) we, us, he/she and I, him/her and me - like all pronouns and personals, takes a when following ki, i, kei and hei but does not take a when used as the subject of the sentence. Never occurs after he, te and ngā.

I hoko kākahu hou māua. / She and I bought new clothes.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 13, 31-32, 52-56, 64-65;)


2. (pronoun) and I, and me - used before ko and a person's name.

Kua kōrero kē māua ko Pou mō taua take. / Pou and I have already spoken about that matter.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 13;)


ō māua Play

1. (determiner) our (his/her and my - more than one thing) - a possessive determiner.

Kei te tatari ō māua kaiako ki te minita. / Our teachers are waiting for the minister.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 52-56;)


2. (determiner) we have (she/he and I but more than one thing).

He whenua ō māua. / We own land.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 108-110;)


3. Used in these ways listed above when the possessor has no control of the relationship or is subordinate, passive or inferior to what is possessed.


(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 54-56, 140-141;)


ā māua Play

1. (determiner) our (his/her and my - more than one thing) - a possessive determiner.

Kei te tatari ā māua ākonga ki te pahi. / Our students are waiting for the bus.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 52-56;)


2. (determiner) our (she/he and I - more than one thing).

He rūri ā māua. / We both have rulers.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 108-110;)


3. Used in these ways listed above when the possessor has control of the relationship or is dominant, active or superior to what is possessed.


(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 54-56, 140-141;)


tā māua Play

1. (determiner) our, i.e. his/her and my (one thing) - often followed by a noun but can stand without one.

Kei te tatari tā māua mokopuna ki te pahi. / Our grandchild is waiting for the bus.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 52-56;)


2. (determiner) we (he/she and I) have (one thing).

He nanekoti tā māua. / We have a goat.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 108-110;)


3. Used in these ways listed above when the possessor has control of the relationship or is dominant, active or superior to what is possessed.


(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 54-56, 140-141;)


tō māua Play

1. (determiner) our, i.e. his/her and my (one thing) - often followed by a noun but can stand without one.

I kōrero tō māua tīpuna mō Māui. / Our grandfather spoke about Māui.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 52-56;)

See also


2. (determiner) we (he/she and I) have (one thing).

He whare wānanga ātaahua tō māua. / She and I have a beautiful university.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 108-110;)


3. Used in these ways listed above when the possessor has no control of the relationship or is subordinate, passive or inferior to what is possessed.


(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 54-56, 140-141;)


Books + Apps

Download

The App

This Māori dictionary is now available as an app. With the iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, and Android app you can use the dictionary anywhere without the need to be online.

iPhone / iPad / Android

Buy

The Book

Te Aka Māori-English, English-Māori Dictionary and Index by John C Moorfield. This dictionary comprises a selection of modern and everyday language that will be extremely useful for learners of the Māori language.

More info