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Found 7 matches

hopi Play

1. (loan) (verb) (-tia) to soap, lather with soap.

Me tino whakamākū ngā makawe ki te wai, ā ka hopi: horoia kia kore he hopi i roto i ngā makawe (TTT 1/4/1923:2). / Thoroughly wet the hair with water and then lather it up with soap: rinse it so that there's no soap left in the hair.


Found 7 matches

2. (loan) (noun) soap.

Me tino whakamākū ngā makawe ki te wai, ā ka hopi: horoia kia kore he hopi i roto i ngā makawe (TTT 1/4/1923:2). / Thoroughly wet the hair with water and then lather it up with soap: rinse it so that there's no soap left in the hair.


uku Play

1. (verb) to wash (using clay for soap).

Ka haere a Marutūāhu ki te uku i tōna māhunga ki te wai, hoki mai, e heru ana (NM 1928:115). / Martūāhu went to wash his hair with water and returned to comb it.


2. (noun) clay, white clay.

Ka oti, ka pania ki te uku a waho, kei puta atu te wai ki a ia (JPS 1904:92). / When it was completed it was plastered with clay, so the water might not get in.


3. (noun) pottery.

He kura ukiuki te mahi uku nō Te Moana-nui-a-Kiwa. Nō te taenga ki Aotearoa ka ngaro i te Māori ēnei pūkenga. Nō te tekau tau 1950 kātahi anō ka tīmata anō te whakamiha atu ki ngā mahi uku i ngā mahi a ngā iwi taketake o Amerika (Te Ara 2017). / Pottery making was an ancient Pacific practice. By the time the Māori reached New Zealand they had lost these skills. From the 1950s Māori artists began making pottery again, drawing inspiration from the work of the native peoples of America.


4. (noun) soap.


kūmarahou Play

1. (noun) gumdiggers' soap, golden Tainui, kūmarahou, Pomaderris kumeraho - a native shrub with alternating, blue-green leaves on top and undersides pale with protruding veins. Flowers are creamy yellow in large, fluffy clusters. The whole plant is covered in a soft mat of hair. Found north of Bay of Plenty and Kāwhia.


2. (noun) pale-flowered kūmarahou, Pomaderris hamiltonii - a rare shrub to 4m tall with soft oval pointed leaves which have prominent veins on the underside and sprays of pale cream flowers. Leaves 5-6.5cm long by 2-3cm wide, tip pointed, with white star-shaped hairs underneath. Fruit dry, small.


3. (noun) koheriki, Scandia rosifolia - prostrate or scrambling shrub with woody stems at the base and 2-5 pairs of leaflets arranged along each side of a midrib.Leaflets have no stem, distinct veins and are finely serrate. Flowers numerous and have white petals. Found north of Taranaki and Napier.

See also kohepiro


4. (noun) tāwheowheo, Quintinia serrata - a small bushy tree of the North Island with pointed oval leaves. The mottled leaves have wavy, shallowly serrated margins. Favours shady places, steep slopes and banks.

See also tāwheowheo


horoi Play

1. (verb) (-a) to wash, clean, wipe, cleanse.

Me tino whakamākū ngā makawe ki te wai, ā ka hopi: horoia kia kore he hopi i roto i ngā makawe (TTT 1/4/1923:2). / Thoroughly wet the hair with water and then lather it up with soap: rinse it so that there's no soap left in the hair.


2. (noun) washing, soap.


3. (noun) wash.

Ko te tino taonga ia mō rātou ko te wai kia āhei ai ratou te horoi i ō rātou tinana, i ngā kākahu, me ngā aha noa, aha noa (KO 15/8/1885:2). / But for them the prized possession is water so that they are able to wash their bodies, clothes and other things.


kūmara rau nui Play

1. gumdiggers' soap, golden Tainui, kūmarahou, Pomaderris kumeraho - a native shrub with alternating, blue-green leaves on top and undersides pale with protruding veins. Flowers are creamy yellow in large, fluffy clusters. The whole plant is covered in a soft mat of hair. Found north of Bay of Plenty and Kāwhia.

See also kūmarahou


pāpapa Play

1. (noun) eggshell, husk, chaff, bran.

He uru hua rākau rahi anō tō rāua, ā, e 60 eka te rahi o te whenua whakatipu ōti, whakatipu pāri, hai pāpapa whāngai i ngā hōiho (TTR 1998:159). / They had a large orchard and 60 acres growing oats and barley to make chaff to feed the horses.
(Te Māhuri Study Guide (Ed. 1): 27;)


2. (noun) squash, kamokamo - a variety of vegetable marrow. This word seems to be peculiar to the northern Ngāti Kahungunu region.

He pēnā anō ngā tōhuka, ngā kānga, ngā pāpapa, ngā merengi, ngā kākāriki, ngā taro me ngā rīwai (HP 1991:14). / The sugar cane, maize, kamokamo, melons, rock melons, taro and potatoes were exactly the same.


3. (noun) beetle - used as a general term for beetles.

E whā ngā momo pāpapa i mau i a mātau (Ng 1995:30). / We caught four kinds of beetles.


4. (noun) common tiger beetle, Cicindela tuberculata, Neocicindela tuberculata - an endemic tiger beetle to Aotearoa/New Zealand. Adults are ground predators and larvae may live for several years in a hole in the ground, and grab and eat passing insects. Adults are commonly seen on clay banks in summer, running around and making short flights as they hunt other insects.


5. (noun) cockroach, stinkroach, black cockroach, Platyzosteria novaeseelandiae - found in the North Island and the northern South Island, it makes a strong smell when disturbed. Lives under the bark of trees and in rotting logs.

See also kēkerengū


6. (noun) slater, pill bug, sow bug, woodlice - terrestrial Isopoda which vary slightly in appearance, but most are conspicuous and easily recognised by their elliptical, flattened segmented bodies, and seven pairs of legs. Colour is usually in the shades of grey, from dark to light, often mottled with green and yellow. Aotearoa/New Zealand slaters range in size from several millimetres to more than 2 cm in length. Slaters are mainly scavengers, feeding on a variety of decaying vegetation, tree bark, rotting wood, etc.


7. (noun) gumdiggers' soap, golden Tainui, kūmarahou, Pomaderris kumeraho - a native shrub with alternating, blue-green leaves on top and undersides pale with protruding veins. Flowers are creamy yellow in large, fluffy clusters. The whole plant is covered in a soft mat of hair. Found north of Bay of Plenty and Kāwhia.

See also kūmarahou


8. (noun) koropuka, bush snowberry, fool's beech, Gaultheria antipoda - native bushy shrub bearing rounded small leathery toothed leaves on hairy twigs. Hairs on twigs black mixed with shorter paler hairs. Flowers white, bell-shaped, solitary at base of leaf. Leaves alternating on stem, 7-10mm long by 6-10mm wide, sometimes much smaller at tip of twig, Fruit red or white.

See also koropuka


hopihopi Play

1. (loan) (verb) (-hia) to soap up, lather up.

Ka hopihopi i te paranene, ā, ka horohoroi i te tinana, ā, huri noa (TTT 1/3/1929:952). / Soap up the flannel and wash the body all over.


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