Clear Search
Found 16 matches
  • filters Arrow
    • Include Idioms
      Exclude Idioms
      Only Idioms
    • Include Phrases
      Exclude Phrases
      Only Phrases
    • Include Proverbs
      Exclude Proverbs
      Only Proverbs
    • Include Loan Words
      Exclude Loan Words
      Only Loan Words
      Include Historical Loan Words
    • Close
Found 16 matches

taniwha Play

1. (noun) water spirit, monster, dangerous water creature, powerful creature, chief, powerful leader, something or someone awesome - taniwha take many forms from logs to reptiles and whales and often live in lakes, rivers or the sea. They are often regarded as guardians by the people who live in their territory, but may also have a malign influence on human beings.

Heoi, ka noho nei te taniwha, ko tana mahi, he patu i ngā tira haere; arā, he kai i ngā tāngata, horopuku tonu, ahakoa he kawenga tā te tangata, ka horomia pukutia e taua taniwha - ahakoa he tamaiti i runga i te hākui e waha ana, ka heke tahi rāua ki roto i te kōpū o te taniwha nei - ahakoa ngā tokotoko me ngā taiaha, ka pau katoa te horo (JPS 1905:200). / And so the taniwha remained there. His occupation was killing the travelling parties - that is, he used to swallow them whole, even if they had loads on their backs they were swallowed up by that taniwha - mothers carrying children on their backs, they went down together into the belly of this taniwha - even walking sticks and taiaha, they were completely swallowed up.
Ko Ureia e kōrerotia nei, ehara i te taniwha patu tangata, rumaki tangata rānei. Engari e karangatia ana a Ureia he tupua, he mauri nō ngā tāngata o tēnei moana o Tīkapa, arā ko Hauraki. Arā he tohu mana o ngā tāngata o tēnei moana...Otiia, e rua āhua taniwha. Tētehi āhua he kaitangata, arā he rumaki tangata ki te wai kia mate ai. Otiia, e kore aua tū taniwha e rumaki noa i te tangata. Mā te hara anō, arā mā te haere ki runga i ngā wāhi tapu, tanumanga tūpāpaku nei. Wāhi tapu rānei, whare o ngā tohunga o aua tū taniwha; wāhi tapu rānei, nohoanga o ngā taniwha. Mā te pērā anake ka horomia ai e ērā tū taniwha...Ko Ureia he ika tonu, he ika nunui atu i te parāoa (JPS 1946:30). / Ureia being discussed, was not a taniwha that killed or drowned people. But Ureia was called a tupua, a mauri of the people of this sea of Tīkapa, that is of Hauraki. In other words it was a symbol of the mana of the people of this sea...But there are two forms of taniwha. One kind is a man-eater, that is it drowns people in water to kill them, but, those taniwha do not drown people without reason, but do so because of an offence, such as going on to prohibited places such as are the burial places of the dead; or the sacred places such as are the houses of the tohunga of those taniwha; or the sacred places which are the places where the taniwha live. It is only for such things would they be swallowed up by those taniwha...Ureia was actually a marine animal, one larger than a sperm whale.


taniwha Play

1. (noun) variety of harakeke from Waiomatatini, East Coast. A handsome bronze coloured harakeke. Deep brown tones with crimson, almost translucent margins and markings along centre of blades. Purply-blue bloom on the underside of the leaves and on the kōrari. Good ornamental.


niho taniwha Play

1. (noun) saw-edged pattern of tukutuku panels and in the tāniko weaving on the hems of cloaks. The principal motif that represents the realm of mythology and a chief's lineage from the gods. Also symbolises family houses within the tribe.


mangō taniwha Play

1. (noun) white shark, white pointer shark, great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias - the largest of man-eating sharks, with the largest individuals known to reach 6 metres in length and 2,268 kilograms in weight. Large spindle-shaped body with pointed snout. Near-symetrical tail, large first dorsal and very small second dorsal fin. Grey above and white below with a sharp demarcation between the two colours.

Titiro ki te weriweri o te āhua o te mangō taniwha nei (Te Ara 2011). / Observe how horrible this white pointer shark looks.

See also mangō ururoa


matawai taniwha Play

1. (noun) variety of harakeke from the Waioeke Gorge. Very tall, slightly bendy variety. Leaves a yellowy–bronze colour with darker shadings. Reddish–brown margin and keel. Very tall seed heads.Used for kete and whāriki.


unuhanga taniwha

1. unleashing the monster - an expression for unleashing something that then proves impossible to control.

Kaua e whakaarahia ake anō taua raruraru - he unuhanga taniwha tēnā mahi. Waiho kia moe ana (HJ 2012:21). / Don't raise that problem gain - that's unleashing the monster. Let it lie.


here-taniwha Play

1. clove hitch - is a type of knot.

Ka mau te here-taniwha ki te hiku o te mangō ka rere, ka kumea e ia te waka (W 1971:46). / The clove hitch was attached to the shark's tail and it pulled the canoe.


Taniwha, Te Horetā Te Play

1. (personal name) (?-1853) Ngāti Whanaunga; leader who, as a boy, met Captain Cook at Whitianga.


(Te Kōhure Textbook (Ed. 2): 134;)


Horetā, Te Taniwha, Te Play

1. (personal name) (?-1853) Ngāti Whanaunga; leader who, as a boy, met Captain Cook at Whitianga.


(Te Kōhure Textbook (Ed. 2): 134;)


whakaturamoe Play

1. (noun) a spell to make people or taniwha sleepy.

Heoi, kātahi ka hapainga te karakia e Pitaka, he whakaturamoe (he rotu) (JPS 1909:205). / Then Pitaka proceeded to uplift his ritual chant, which was to put it to sleep (a spell for putting it into a deep sleep).


koropatu

1. (verb) (-tia) to perform a ritual chant to kill taniwha.

Nā Koikihi rā i koropatutia ki te koropatu taniwha (M 2007:90). / It was Koikihi who claimed them with the rites to slay dragons (M 2007:91).


2. (noun) ritual chant to kill taniwha.


rotu Play

1. (verb) (-a) to put to sleep by means of a spell - usually used in the passive form.

Ka rotua te whare e ngā wāhine rā, ka whakamoemoea kia moe (NM 1928:30). / The people in the house were put under a spell that put them to sleep.


2. (verb) (-a) to be overcome by sleep - usually used in the passive form.

Kātahi anō ka tineia te ahi, ka poko, ka rotua te tangata whenua e te moe (JPS 1928:269). / Then the fire was extinguished, and when it was out, the local people were overcome by sleep.


3. (noun) a spell for putting people or taniwha into a deep sleep.

Heoi, kātahi ka hapainga te karakia e Pitaka, he whakaturamoe (he rotu) (JPS 1909:205). / Then Pitaka proceeded to uplift his ritual chant, which was to put it to sleep (it was a spell for putting it into a deep sleep).


kī-o-rahi Play

1. (noun) a traditional ball game - played with a small round flax ball called a . Two teams of seven players, kaioma and taniwha, play on a circular field divided into zones, and score points by touching the pou (boundary markers) and hitting a central tupu, or target. The game is played with varying rules(e.g. number of people, size of field, tag ripping rules, etc.) depending on the geographic area it is played in. It is played for 4 quarters or 2 halves of a set time, teams alternate roles of kīoma and taniwha at 1/2 or 1/4 time.


Parata Play

1. (personal name) a taniwha living in mid-ocean which swallows vessels but can be controlled by tohunga.

I tō rātou hekenga ka tata toremi rātou ki te korokoro o Te Parata (Te Ara 2012). / During the voyage they were nearly swallowed up in the throat of Te Parata.


ō Play

1. (particle) has, have, own (when referring to more than one thing).

He whare ō Tīpene. / Stephen owns houses.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 108-110;)


2. (particle) those of, the ... of.

He paruparu ake ngā hū o Māia i ō Terewai. / Māia's shoes are dirtier than those of Terewai.
(Te Pihinga Textbook (Ed. 2): 126;)


3. (particle) Used in the ways listed in 1 and 2 above when the possessor has, or had, no control of the relationship or is subordinate, passive or inferior to what is possessed. Thus, in most contexts in a sentence, words for parts of anything, clothing, adornments associated with the body, things that originate in the body (feelings, ideas, knowledge, beliefs, sins, problems, luck, etc.), parts of the body, qualities, illnesses, transport, water, medicine, buildings, seating, bedding, land, towns, companions, superiors, relatives (not husband, wife, children, grandchildren), taniwha,  atua, groups, organisations, tribes and government are likely to take the o category. This includes actions that are regarded as part of the nature of people or animals. O will follow kore and korenga. Derived nouns from statives and verbs will usually take the o category. Experience verbs are also likely to take the o category.

He ingoa hou ō Poia. / Poia has a new name.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 54-56, 140-141;)

See also o


o Play

1. (particle) of, belongs to, from, attached to - used when the possessor has, or had, no control of the relationship or is subordinant, passive or inferior to what is possessed. Thus, in most contexts in a sentence, words for parts of anything, clothing, adornments associated with the body, things that originate in the body (feelings, ideas, knowledge, beliefs, sins, problems, luck, etc.), parts of the body, qualities, illnesses, transport, water, medicine, buildings, seating, bedding, land, towns, companions, superiors, relatives (not husband, wife, children, grandchildren), taniwha,  atua, groups, organisations, tribes and government are likely to take the o category. This includes actions that are regarded as part of the nature of people or animals. O will follow kore and korenga. Derived nouns from statives and verbs will usually take the o category. Experience verbs are also likely to take the o category.

Ko Taki te hoa o Mere. / Taki is Mere's friend.
Koia nā te paterotanga o te kurī. / That's the fart of a dog.
Heke ana ngā roimata o te kuia i te waiatatanga o te hīmene 'Piko nei te Mātenga' (HJ 2012:115). / The elderly woman's tears flowed when the hymn 'Piko nei te Mātenga' was sung.
I te korenga o tana matua i whakaae ki tana whaiāipo, ka eke a Te Miro ki runga i tō rātau waka ko 'Te Punga-i-Orohia' te ingoa, kātahi ka whakatotohu i a ia kia toremi (EM 2002:111). / Because her father did not agree to her lover, Te Miro climbed on their canoe, called 'Te Punga-i-Orohia', then drowned herself.
(Te Kākano Textbook (Ed. 2): 52-56, 140-142; Te Kākano Study Guide (Ed. 1): 2, 16, 23, 33-34, 36; Te Pihinga Study Guide (Ed. 1): 9-10; Te Māhuri Textbook (Ed. 2): 178-179;)

See also a


Books + Apps

Download

The App

This Māori dictionary is now available as an app. With the iPhone, iPod Touch, iPad, and Android app you can use the dictionary anywhere without the need to be online.

iPhone / iPad / Android

Buy

The Book

Te Aka Māori-English, English-Māori Dictionary and Index by John C Moorfield. This dictionary comprises a selection of modern and everyday language that will be extremely useful for learners of the Māori language.

More info